Monthly Archives: February 2014

Is your baby hungry?

feedme

As a parent one of the hardest things is when people in a position of authority give conflicting advice.

I’m sure everyone in the UK is aware that the recommended age for weaning (in the UK this means starting solids) is 6 months. Professionals are resolute that this is the optimum time to introduce your baby to foods (unless they advise you otherwise on medical grounds). However, when the advice was 4-6 months, I’m confident that the professionals were certain that anywhere in this range was a suitable time.

I understand that research progresses our knowledge and the government don’t make recommendations without giving the facts due consideration, however I feel that these strict guidelines are just another way of pressurising parents. And if you don’t manage to wait till 6 months then, ‘Tut Tut, don’t you want to give your baby the best start in life?’

I weaned both my boys at around 5 months. I actually tried the second one at 4 months but he wasn’t interested at that time (I was hoping it might help with the colicky symptoms he displays in the evenings). So that leads me to wonder…

Does it even matter? Wouldn’t your baby let you know if they weren’t happy? Isn’t that why lots of people do wean early? I doubt anyone out there is force feeding a baby who doesn’t enjoy food.

I don’t have the answers. I’m just not entirely convinced that the Doctor’s and Health Visitors do either!

Did you wean your baby ‘early’, and if so do you feel guilty about it?   I love reading your comments and reply to as many as I can.

Binky Linky
nan bread pizza

Cheat’s Homemade Pizza

In my youth I had a job working in an independent pizzeria, and when I left, my troubles began. At work I was able to design a pizza exactly as I liked it. The right amount of sauce, toppings and cheese were crucial to my enjoyment. After I left (and moved to a different country) I couldn’t get a pizza to please me.. and believe you me, I tried!

Shop bought ones don’t have enough topping, pizzeria chains just don’t float my boat (some of them taste more like cardboard than pizza) and I’ve never cooked with yeast before so I was too nervous about trying to make my own base.

Then one day, quite accidently, I made a cheat’s homemade pizza using plain Naan bread as the base. I must have been low on food as the only thing I had for sauce was tomato puree, and I think the only topping I had was cheese.

It was gorgeous!

Normally tomato puree is too tangy on its own, but it balanced out beautifully with the naan bread. I’m actually convinced a pizza sauce wouldn’t be as nice, and as I think my cheat’s pizza’s are already perfect I have no intention of trying!

The beauty of this discovery is of course that you can tailor the toppings to your own personal taste, and as naan bread is readily available in different sizes it’s easy to make one without having lots of leftovers!

Just use small naans for small appetites and large naans for larger appetites. In additional, naan bread freezes really well so if you keep some in the freezer it’s a really easy tasty snack for any unexpected play-dates. Just microwave on the defrost setting for 10 second blasts until they have thawed.

As per the pack instructions I always sprinkle a little water on my naan bread, then spread on some tomato puree and add my toppings. Cook in the oven at 180degrees for 10-15 minutes and bingo! Delicious served with a side salad, or simply on it’s own.

nan bread pizza

Cheat’s Homemade Pizza

Binky Linky

Glengormley Sportsbowl

I was actually disappointed to have arranged to go bowling on what turned out to be the first dry day in about 3 months. However, as Lewis was all excited about his first trip bowling, off we went.
It is years, literally about 10, since I went bowling and I was delighted that wearing my trainers had prevented me having to don the dreaded bowling shoes! Glengormley Sportsbowl  I give you brownie points for that!
We had booked a lane for an hour, though you can pay per game if you prefer. If you go it is definitely worth asking about their deals as these can work out much better on the purse (or wallet) than paying the standard rate.
Like many of the bowling alleys today, the Sportsbowl has the requisite fluorescent lighting, but they also had automatic bumpers which were set for any members of the group who desired them. In my younger days you had to do that yourself, manually. Technology today is a wonderful thing! They also had the ramps for younger players to push the balls from, though those these did need to be moved manually every turn.
places o go in northern ireland
There is a small cafe selling the usual fast food, burgers and the like, and also an array of arcade type amusements which will entertain your child and gobble up your money!
Unusually, they had a small go kart track which I’m sure older children would love. Children from the age of three can use these if accompanied by an adult, though we didn’t have a go this time.
In hindsight maybe an hour long booking wasn’t the best idea. Lewis (3) was really enjoying himself for the first 30 minutes or so but then he became bored and wanted to go and explore what else was on offer. However this meant Mr C. had double turns, and thus more practise, which is the only reason he beat me!

bowling3050

So you think you know Northern Ireland?

Northern Ireland is know for many things, some of them weird and wonderful, some just weird, some just wonderful. If you think you have the
inside knowledge take my quiz to find out….

Take Our Quiz!

I’m expecting 100% scores from all local people, and at least 50% from visitors! Good luck!
Don’t forget to share with your friends.

I’ve banned my 3 year old from Power Rangers!

My oldest son, Lewis, will be four in May and in September he started pre-school. He loved it. As a sociable child he was more than keen to attend, and I was grateful to have a couple of hours to myself each day. I still am. He learns all sorts of skills that I thought him incapable of, however he also discovered something I have come to loath. Power Rangers!

Apparently during free play this is a common game with the children. I know when they’ve been playing it as he comes home imitating a marshall arts instructor and Hi-Ya-ing his way around the house.

At first I thought it was cute. Then he discovered Power Rangers is actually a program on t.v. at the weekends. He would sit glued to the screen, and then minute the credits rolled, jump up and run around the house like some kind of demented ninja! He would run straight into me, high kick the doors and furniture, and shout loudly. I have heard other parents say similar programs like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, have a similar effect on their children.

Again, I wasn’t overly concerned. My little boy was growing up, and boys like a bit of rough and tumble. After a couple of weeks the behaviour took a turn for the worse. I caught him trying to karate chop his 6 month brother Aaron. I couldn’t believe it! Usually Lewis is really good with the baby. I honestly think he was so involved in his pretend role play, that he didn’t quite realise what he was doing. At least, that’s the theory I’m sticking with it for now.

From that moment on, I decided to ban him from watching Power Rangers. He doesn’t know this, as I’m pretty sure he would have a meltdown if I told him. My plan is simply to make sure we are out of the house when it is on and hope he forgets about it. I know he will continue to play Power Rangers with his peers at pre-school, and that’s okay. I’m not trying to stop him from being a boy, but hopefully I can stop  him from trying to eliminate his younger brother!

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